Mizoram

Mizoram is located in the northeastern part of the country and is bounded by Myanmar (Burma) to the east and south and Bangladesh to the west and by the states of Tripura to the northwest, Assam to the north, and Manipur to the northeast.

More than three-fourths of the land area of Mizoram is forested. Thick evergreen forests contain valuable timber trees, such as champak (Michelia champaca), ironwood, and gurjun (genus Dipterocarpus). The woodlands also provide habitat for many animals, including elephants, tigers, bears, deer, monkeys, gibbons, and serows (wild goatlike mammals). Such animals are protected in a number of national parks and wildlife sanctuaries. 

The residents of Mizoram consist almost entirely of Scheduled Tribes (an official category embracing indigenous groups that fall outside the predominant Indian social hierarchy). These groups are loosely called Mizo, a local term meaning “highlanders.” Among the most prominent of the Mizo peoples are the Kuki, Pawi, and Lakher. Most of the Mizo are Tibeto-Burman peoples, speaking Mizo or a closely related Tibeto-Burman language or dialect. One group in the state, however, the Chakma, speaks an Indo-Aryan language. Mizo and English are the principal and official languages. Having no script of its own, Mizo uses the Roman alphabet.

 

(Video Credit to Mizoram Tourism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtMMsdd2IjM)


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